New York’s New Catalytic Converter Laws

For those of you living in the glorious State of New York there is a new law about catalytic converters that came into play on January 1st, 2014. I would highly suggest that you pay attention if you live in New York because the fines can range from $500 for the first offense to $26,000 for each subsequent violation. Section 177 of the federal clean air act (42 USC &7507) gives each state the right to adopt California’s low emission vehicle (LEV) program standards in their own state. New York has decided to do just that. This isn’t a very hard to understand program but it has certain aspects that make it complicated. This applies to all vehicles made since 1993 except 1995 models. So; if your car was made in 1993, 1994, 1996 or anytime thereafter then this applies to you. The basic gist of this new law states that you can no longer install or sell used catalytic converters on any vehicle licensed in the state of New York. Also, new ones must be original equipment manufacturer (OEM) parts or new AMCC’s certified as meeting CARB standards. This applies to all makes and models of vehicles that are “50 State” certified via the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) or CARB certified. This does not apply to vehicles older than 1993 or vehicles from 1995.

The new New York catalytic converters for CARB and 50 State EPA certified vehicles must display 2 certification stamps or laser etchings on opposite sides of the catalytic converter or heat shield. Each stamp or etching must show the CARB Executive Order approval number, part number, date of manufacture, and proper installation direction. You should also check the vehicle for the AMCC Emissions Certification Markings. Your vehicle’s emissions certification information is located on the Vehicle Emissions Certification Information (VECI) label which can be found in the vehicle’s engine compartment. The engine family and emissions certification will be used to discover which AMCCs may legally be installed on your particular vehicle. There are three common places that you will find the VECI, they are the radiator support, the strut tower plate and the hood.

Due to the new law it is now illegal to sell, offer to sell, install or advertise used or recycled NY catalytic converters for any vehicle made in 1993, 1994, 1996 or any year afterwards. You are still allowed to use salvaged catalytic converters on vehicles manufactured before 1993 and you are still allowed to sell your used catalytic converter for salvage on any vehicle. Installers of new CARB certified AMCCs must fill out a warranty card in triplicate. The original warranty card must go to the customer, then one copy goers to the installer, and the last copy goes to the manufacturer of the converter. Installers of the new CARB certified AMCCs also must keep a copy on file for four years. Due to the steep fines it is best to abide by the new regulations whether you are the consumer or the retailer.

Ending Your Car Engine Sludge Problem: Remedies That Work!

Engine sludge formation. Here is how it gets in your motor. And a new, inexpensive way to remove sludge without the need to take your motor apart.

When your car is about 4 years old and older. When your car’s odometer miles run pass 75,000 miles, sticky residues; leftovers from pass oil changes, begin to build faster and gum-up your motors piston rings. Your motors dirty piston rings are the primary cause of sludge formation. It happens in this way.

Your motor’s pistons have 3, 1/8 inch thick flexible, bracelet-like rings that have a springy nature to them. This keeps them ever expanding outward to provide blockage to keep your motor oil from escaping into the combustion cycle. And keep your fuels combustion gases totally above the piston. Its all needed to push your piston down, spinning gears, and wheels to propel you forward with zip and ease. Sludge begins when…

Engine sludge formation occurs when your piston rings allows those1500 degree combustion gases to slip pass them. This happens when dirty piston ring flexing outward action is slowed or reduced. A gap appears and with each burst of new combustion, little puffs of combustion escape pass your pistons and mix with your motor oil.

Well anyhow, there is always some escape of combustion, called blowby by us mechanics, even when your pistons rings work perfectly well. When rings and cylinder wear spaces allow more combustion to escape, you sludge your motor oil in a month of driving and you, by motor design vent it to the outside world. That is no good for air, water, old folks and children with breathing problems.

To prevent your cars heavily loaded combustion gases; containing a handful of suphurs, 5 gallons of raw gas, carbon black, and dozens of other negatives from being dumped into the air every 3000 miles of driving, a device is made to block its escape. Instead it is channel back into the combustion process. This is done by a thumb size check valve and hoses in a new motor sub-system called the positive crankcase ventilation system.

The positive crankcase ventilation system is overpowered by all that sticky, hot blowby and soon chokes down the blowby flow. When that happens sludge formation goes bonkers, like kids during their first year on the loose at college. Kids party. Sludge forms a 1/4 inch layer over every part. Kids know better. your motor does not!

The fix: Soon, your car starts losing its zip. It may consume motor oil. It may tap. Your exhaust smells worst than than your kids tennis after soccer practice. Friction wear is now running rampant. The usual fix is an overhaul at $3000 or more. Or a partial cleaning called an engine valve repair at up to $2000 in cost. Its a nasty, time consuming job to take apart and clean every part.

Engine Flushing. You may have read about all kinds of flushing methods from stepping on two frogs, to putting automatic transmission fluid and solvent in your motor to clean out the sludge. parts stores even sell engine flushes, which are solvents to do the job.

The bad thing about solvent motor flushes is they strip your pistons, bearings, valves, and gears of their vital oil lube film as they rinse away the sludge. And some of that sludge, during circulation, reform in all the wrong places. Usually blocking your motor’s oil pump pickup screen. About a week of driving after such a cleaning, your motor goes in convulsions. The mechanic say, in diagnosis,”It’s shot!”

New products to safely remove sludge using anti-wear cleaners are what is needed, if engine sludge is your motor’s problem. A leader in the field for internal engine cleaning and sludge removal with engine restorative ingredients is Mega Power. The Mega Power Sludge Removing Worn Motor Treatment is fast, and takes less than a hour. Mega Power is safe because it has friction reducers that lube even without the presence of oil. and it removes sludge over a 6000 miles time span. Instant restorative power results. Cost is under $100 – not $3000. And you can install the treatment yourself. Nothing to take apart. Driving does the cleaning. You can learn more and get ordering info at:

The Edge of a Honda

The eighties has been a good transition point for many, when the cult of American Top 40 went global. One of the hallmarks of this era is the birth of consciousness on how we as consumers kill the environment from the noxious gases produced by our hair sprays as well as our vehicles. I can still remember being taught in grade school about how humans and technology are the primary source of pollution and how technology cannot on its own get by without its by product. Presently, we can only look back and cringe at the time we cared more about how big our hairs are than if what we are doing is hurting the environment or not.

Lucky for us, in the past few years, car manufacturers have taken the path of being conscious of their environment as well. As more and more people exhibit interest in preserving the earth, a demand for companies supporting Sustainable Development also increases. Among the car manufacturing giants, Japanese car maker Honda blazes the trail with new innovations that does not compromise being nature friendly. So far, the company has introduced models that are equipped with earth friendly technology meeting EURO 4 emission regulations.

Two of the more popular “green” engines launched by Honda are the i-DSI engine and the i-VTEC engine.

The i-DSI Engine

The name i-DSI stands for Intelligent- Dual and Sequential Ignition. This Honda engine has garnered a “Low Emission Excellence” certificate from the Ministry of Transportation in Japan. The i-DSI is known and liked by many for its lightweight, compact high performance engine that is packed with a lot of horses and ample torque regardless of the RPM level. The efficient combustion of this engine at any rpm translates to cleaner exhaust gas emissions.

The i-VTEC Engine

Taking its name from its ability to change valve and timing on its intake and exhaust sides, the VTEC (Variable Valve Timing and Lift Electronic Control) engine is praised by many not only for performance but because of being a pioneer among other valve mechanisms. The i-VTEC engine can be found in Honda models like the Civic (for its 1.8 SOHC and 2.0 DOHC models), the Accord (for its 2.4 and 3.0 V6 models) and the CRV. This engine boasts of fuel efficiency while still delivering optimum performance, burning less fuel while producing less pollutants. When a lot of enthusiasts were thinking that there is no way the VTEC can get any better, Honda has produced its more intelligent twin with the i-VTEC, producing a more earth friendly and a more globally compliant system.

I feel that as more car manufacturers jump to the wagon of caring for our mother earth, we are given not only a good choice of what vehicles to buy but a chance to work for a worthwhile cause also. Indeed, technology must be harnessed as a means of improving function without compromising the ecosystem. The technology that blends seamlessly to ones lifestyle without posing any threat to the environment is definitely a vision worth toiling for.

The Windshield Replacement Survival Guide – Consumer Auto Glass Education

Replacing Your Vehicle’s Windshield? Here is Your Windshield Replacement Survival Guide.

Safety First

A vehicles windshield provides the occupants a barrier from road debris and the outside elements. But most people don’t know a windshield is designed for structural safety in case of an accident, especially a rollover. A windshield is a vehicles third most important safety feature behind the seat belts, and air bags.

Windshields are like basketball backboards for air bags. So if you have a damaged windshield your air bag may not function correctly. It actually may inflate out the windshield cavity, rather than towards you. Or it won’t adsorb any pressure because your windshield simply pushes out.

Most consumers are not aware that when technicians replace your windshield, there is significant scratching to the “pinchweld” where the glass bonds to the car. These scratches must be prepped using paint and rust prevention steps. They should not simply leave exposed scratches where moisture from the exterior side can cause rust to develop.

Here are some questions you should ask your auto glass company:

  • Is the new glass OEM?
  • Did they remove the brand label on the windshield?
  • Does the new glass have a shade band that matches your old glass?
  • Is the new windshield the same color glass? (glass is actually colored, not clear)
  • Does your windshield have a rain sensor?
  • Is your windshield heated? (companies will install non-heated and charge for heated)
  • Does the windshield have the right bracket for your rear view mirror?
  • Does the new windshield have the same third visor as your old glass? (the painted black design which you can see around the rear view mirror on most cars)
  • Are they using a universal trim molding, or the actual trim molding part for your vehicle?
  • Does the company pay to fix paint scratches, if made by the auto glass technician?

Always inspect a piece of glass for scratches and distortion before it’s installed.

Types of Automotive Glass

A windshield is actually two layers of glass with a laminate material between the layers, what is called “laminated glass”. Laminated glass is extremely hard to puncture or break apart. That’s why a large object like a stunt man, can impact the windshield without breaking through. The strength of laminated glass combined with proper adhesion of the windshield to the body of the car provides massive strength against the roof collapsing in a rollover.

All of the other windows in your vehicle are “tempered glass”, which means they break into tiny fragments to reduce injury to the occupants. (a small fraction of vehicles have laminated side and rear windows also)

Windshield Urethane

Today’s vehicles use urethane as the adhesive to bond the windshield to the vehicle, like a glue. Some urethane after complete hardening which can take 2-4 weeks, can hold 500 pounds per square inch of pressure. That’s one reason why you could never simply push your windshield out. Impossible! Some urethane allows you to drive away within one hour after installing the windshield, hardening just enough to withstand vehicle accidents. When your replacement has been completed, make sure to inspect the inside of your vehicle around the edge of the glass. Make sure no urethane has oozed out into view or onto your vehicles interior. This is more common then people realize and needs to be fixed immediately before the glue hardens!

The urethane is normally heated, then applied to the glass or car body at the raised temperature. Depending on where you live or the application, they can use different kinds of urethane, even a cold temperature apply that is not heated. Temperature has a huge impact on the adhesion qualities of the windshield. I would recommend never getting your windshield replaced in temperatures lower than 55 degrees, or higher than 105 for the best results if possible. This is easy if you have the glass replaced inside of a shop or in a shaded area. Direct sunlight can heat the windshield to over 125 degrees!

Urethane does have an expiration date, so make sure you ask about this before a technician begins replacing your vehicle glass. Using expired urethane means minimal bonding power and the windshield has a chance of coming out during an impact. All urethane is made with an expiration date printed on the tubes, and if they don’t call someone else!

Paint Scratches, Rust, and Proper Windshield Installation

Deep vehicle scratches can turn into major problems later. Moisture will enter through a scratch and attack your vehicles body causing rust later. For people who live by the ocean, this can be disastrous for the structural integrity of your vehicle down the road near the windshield. If you are buying a used vehicle, make sure you check around the edge of the glass and under the trim molding for evidence of rust. Rust will spread under your paint, it is amazingly aggressive.

If the rust spreads to the “pinch weld” which is where the urethane is placed, the urethane will not bond and a windshield will leak or can even be pushed out. This can cause thousands of dollars in damage from water leaks or can even can cause death in an accident! If the rust moves into this area the technician must remove it before applying the urethane, or the vehicle must be sent to a body shop for repair.

Make sure the technician takes steps to prep and repair scratches to the pichweld. There is primer paints, metal rust prep chemicals, and other ways to cover scratches to reduce the appearance or spread of rust. The most important areas are where water will contact your vehicles body, especially under the exterior trim molding. That trim is not water sealed between the body and glass. The water seal comes from the urethane bead.

It is very important that you watch the installation of your vehicle glass if possible, DO NOT just walk away. If a professional technician can not perform the job while you watch, they shouldn’t be working on your vehicle and call someone else. A technician can cause significant paint scratching to your exterior paint job with improper techniques. Some even use nail polish or paint to hide the damage. Some even rub dirt into the scratch to make it look old! Ensure that the technician is using vehicle protective equipment like seat covers, floor mats, tape on the car body where it’s close to the glass, and a protective mat over your hood.

Make sure the technician removes body parts like windshield wiper arms and the cowling (located beneath the wipers) are removed, if the glass edge is covered by these parts. Most technicians will simply shoot a ton of urethane under the cowling area and “stuff” the glass, sliding it into the glue and under the cowling. This is extremely unsafe! A technician doesn’t even know if the urethane has created a proper seal, or if it is bonded safely. A proper windshield installation requires that the glass be place straight down onto the urethane bead. Also this ensures the urethane is not shot all over parts beneath the cowling like wiper assemblies and wiring.

OEM Windshields and OEM Equivalents

OEM means, original equipment manufacturer. So if your vehicle is a Honda Civic, OEM glass would be purchased from a Honda Vehicle Dealer. Auto glass installers can simply order OEM glass from the dealer. Make sure the glass has the OEM label. The windshield label which is about a square inch in size, normally is located in the lower corners of the glass. Sometimes OEM glass says the actual glass manufacturer rather than the Car Dealer name. Call your local dealer on what to look for.

A lot of auto glass companies will tell you they are installing the “OEM Equivalent” part. Because consumers don’t know what to look for, most times a glass with no label or an aftermarket part is used. Do not buy a glass when the label has been etched or removed. No one knows where it came from! Always check the label.

The only scenario in which you may find an equivalent glass, is purchasing a windshield produced by the same manufacturer which produced the OEM glass. It may even be from the same production line and mold from the OEM manufacturing!

Aftermarket Automotive Windshields

Do not be fooled into thinking an aftermarket windshield is the same as an OEM glass. Aftermarket windshields are made using reverse engineering instead of the original OEM mold and production line.

Aftermarket glass tends to have more visible light distortion when viewing the glass at an angle, and the dimensions are not exactly the same as an OEM. All glass that is bent has some level distortion yes, but it is considerably worse with aftermarket manufacturing. You may even see distortion when looking straight through aftermarket glass.

Aftermarket glass is transported through different processes than OEM glass from a dealer. A lot of OEM glass is transported covered by plastic wrapping and using strict shipping techniques, and the windshield’s edges are protected by foam wrapping. But Aftermarket glass is transported by much different practices. Most auto glass companies use no protection covering all surfaces of the glass for transport. And sometimes pieces of glass have been taken to customers locations and returned to the distributor or shop. So aftermarket glass has been handled many times!

Now I’m not saying aftermarket glass is unsafe or unfit to use at all. I’m simply stating the facts about the truth, for your education and insight. I feel you should be educated about this part of your vehicle which essentially protects your family on a regular basis.

Rain Sensors and Other Accessory Plugs Such as Heated Glass

If your vehicle has a rain sensor it should be located near the rear view mirror. A lot of times it looks like a circle, square or triangle. This option allows the windshield wipers to speed up or slow down depending on the amount of rain automatically. Make sure you get the same designed glass. If the rain sensor involves a gel patch, make sure the technician does not leave lots of air bubbles when installing it. Those air bubbles can cause the sensor to malfunction.

Some vehicles like a Land Rover, have plugs located under the interior a-pillar trim. On some convertibles like a newer Ford Thunderbird, a large portion of the interior may need to be diss-assembled to remove the interior a-pillar trim. On the Honda Ridgeline, the heater plug is located behind the glove box. Some new vehicles also have Lane Departure sensors located near the rear view mirror.

You can always find out what you need by calling your local dealer and giving them your VIN Identification number from your vehicle. If your car is important to you and you want to maintain the investment, always call your local dealer and ask for advice about your specific vehicle.

Windshield Shade Bands and Windshield Color

All auto glass has a shaded color. No windshields are completely clear. Typical shading colors are blue, green, bronze, and grey. Be sure sure to get the same color. You will see that all pieces of glass in your vehicle are the same color, excluding privacy glass and tinting.

A windshield may have a shade band across the top near the roof of the vehicle. This area is preferential. You should decide if you like it or not. It does tend to hide the edge of the interiors headliner when looking at the vehicle from the exterior. Shade bands do come in different colors but not all windshields

Most windshields can be ordered without a shade band at all. But you may find the part is actually more expensive because less people order it. Having a shade band does provide some shading in between your sun visors but it does little to drastically shade the sun. Take note the shade band will be darker at night.

Exterior Trim and Moldings

Your vehicle may have exterior trim or moldings cover the edge of the glass and/or covering the edge the car body. If the trim molding is just rubber, make sure you know what the technician is using to replace it. Some companies are now requiring that technicians use only a universal type aftermarket molding, rather than one that is specifically designed for your car. There should also be an OEM molding part available which is exactly the same as your original molding. Do note that cost for OEM is always more.

You may see plastic and/or metal trim moldings covering the edge of your windshield on the exterior. Normally these have some type of plastic or metal clips that attach them to the glass or vehicles body. Make sure the company replaces any broken clips or parts from removal of these parts. If your vehicle is older than 3 years, these parts become very brittle and damage easy. You may be warned about parts that always break, in which the company may request you also purchase that part ahead of time. You may find a lot of companies simply glue those parts back into place, rather than replacing the broken parts.

Vehicle Windshield Logo and VIN Window

On vehicles like a Ford Mustang and Ford F150, you may have a logo in the third visor above the rear view mirror. These windshields can be ordered with out the logo and are cheaper that way. Make sure you ask about your options.

Most windshields have a small narrow window for viewing of the VIN identification number near the lower drivers side portion of the glass. Make sure this window is in the right location on the glass. When the job is completed, make sure that glue has not covered the VIN, the VIN number plate has not been cut off, or that it has not been badly damaged. Police or the DMV will give you a hard time if the number is not legible or is completely missing from that location.

2006 Acura RSX: The Luxurious Sports Car

Transforming advanced styling and performance for drivers is the 2006 Acura RSX. This new vehicle dominates the open road. It is one of the most popular vehicles out in the streets and this is also one vehicle that people like to be seen with. The 2006 Acura RSX has been made available in two trim levels. This comprise of the RSX and the RSX Type S. Upon introduction, both come equipped with a 2.0 liter engine that is very powerful and can produce around 200 horsepower.

The interior of the 2006 Acura RSX boasts of luxury. It is also shows off a sporty look and luxury details all throughout. Its interior has been compared to that of a race car’s. The driver-oriented cockpit of the RSX wraps around the driver. Each switch, and each control, has been strategically positioned for intuitive interaction between the driver and the 2006 Acura RSX. The specifications of this vehicle have greatly improved. Considerably, it could be the best car that Acura the company has ever offered the automobile world.

Behind the luxurious and sophisticated interior and the sporty design that the 2006 Acura RSX delivers, everything is enclosed and surrounded by a foundation of safety. This vehicle has been specially designed so as to help drivers steer clear of trouble. It also assists in protecting ht driver and its occupants in cases of accidents, crashes, or collisions. The standard safety features that the 2006 Acura RSX has includes side-impact crash zones, airbags, and pretension seatbelts.

Although the 2006 Acura RSX kind of lacks the occasional front-drive darting feature, and the lack of technology features, this new vehicle would still be your kind of car that would offer superior handling, a decent sound system, and an i-VTEC engine that produces efficient power production.

The features that the 2006 Acura RSX boasts of include standard airbags, a roadside assistance, an adaptive cruise control, and antilock brakes. As per other features, this vehicle has a smart climate control that lets you just set it and then forget it, a keyless entry, a two-way security system, a 12 volt power outlet, an available front drive drivetrain, a brake by wire, a drive by wire, the OnStar system, and a roadside assistance system.

The 2006 Acura RSX holds sporty bolstered seats that have integrated headrests. This hugs the driver while on the road. Another set of features include a steering wheel wrapped in leather, gauges having a metallic face, power windows, power locks, power mirrors, and a premium sound system. All these create a sporty and luxurious atmosphere.